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Bumble announces a week-long paid leave to combat workplace burn-out

Bumble announces a week-long paid leave to combat workplace burn-out
Bumble announces a week-long paid leave to combat workplace burn-out

To eliminate workplace stress caused by the pandemic, Bumble, the company behind the dating application, has reportedly announced that it is providing a paid leave for a week to its 700 employees globally. The employees have been instructed to shut off and concentrate just on themselves.

Back in April, the company had announced that all Bumble staff would be getting a paid, completely offline one-week vacation in June.

Through an official statement, a Bumble spokesperson stated that the company wanted to allow its teams across the world a week to switch off and focus on themselves. Like everyone else, the company’s worldwide staff has had a really hard time during this pandemic.

The spokesperson added that a small team of customer service representatives would be working in case any of the application's users face difficulties. These employees will be granted time off at a later time to ensure that they take a full week off as well.

On Twitter, a senior executive disclosed that the founder of Bumble, Whitney Wolfe Herd, made the decision having accurately picked up on the collective exhaustion of employees.

With fast user growth and stock market debut, Bumble has had a busier year than most companies.

As boredom set in and swiping for a match picked up during the lockdown, Bumble has grown up immensely in popularity.

According to its most recent set of data, the number of paid users on Bumble and Badoo (a bumble-owned app) increased by 30% in the first quarter of 2021, compared to the same period last year.

Recently Bumble founder, Whitney Wolfe Herd also made history as the youngest woman to take an enterprise public in the United States at the age of 31, when she handled Bumble's first public offering in February.

Herd rang the Nasdaq bell while carrying her 1.6 year old child, and in her speech, stated that she wanted to make the internet a nicer, more transparent place.

Source credit: https://www.bbc.com/news/business-57562230

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Sunil Jha

Sunil Jha has been a part of the content industry for close to two years. Having previously worked as a voice over artist and sportswriter, he now focuses on writing articles for newsorigins.com, across a slew of topics, ranging from technology to trade and finance. With a business-oriented educational background, Sunil brings forth the expertise of deep-dive research and a strategic approach in his write ups.